Monday, May 21, 2018

Attention, Mental Health, Book Tour, and More

GETTING IT. A teacher writes in Education Week about students who have trouble paying attention. She says, "Some of my brightest, most creative, and capable minds are the ones who struggle to pay attention in class." Does she tell them, "listen better" or "focus"? Nope. Instead, she'll have an individual conversation with the student about their attention issues, with results she says "can be truly profound." Read more.

CELEBRITIES, MENTAL HEALTH. US News notes, "It's become the new norm for stars to divulge vulnerabilities once kept closely guarded." The news organization gives plenty of examples and quotes a psychologist about the benefits of de-stigmatization and normalization by such revelations. The article also points to the campaign #MyYoungerSelf by the Child Mind Institute, currently returning for year two in Mental Health Awareness Month (May). Find the article. Find #MyYoungerSelf.

ADDITUDE offers on its website an explanation of executive function disorder (EFD) and how it fits with ADHD and/or LDs. "When a professional evaluating a child or adult finds evidence of EFD, it is essential for her to clarify whether the disorder results in ADHD, LD, or both. Only then can the child or adult receive the appropriate treatment for his specific problem," says the article. Find it.

TiLT BOOK TOUR. Debbie Reber has scheduled visits to a number of cities in the U.S. in June as part of the launch of her book Differently Wired: Raising an Exceptional Child in a Conventional World. According to Reber, "[T]he plan for tour stops is simple: meaningful discussions about how we can change the future for differently wired kids, community building through connection, crowdsourcing favorite local resources, no-holds-barred Q&A, and real, authentic conversations. (And potentially some special guests, TiLT swag giveaways, and yummy treats!)" We see four East Coast cities on her list, three West Coast cities -- and Chicago (actually Anderson's Bookshop in Naperville)! Find out more.

SMART KIDS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES offers "Why College Is Daunting for LD Students." The reasons include pressure, workload, personal responsibility, and seven more. Find out more about college traps to anticipate.

UNDERSTOOD has an upcoming Expert Chat this Thursday titled "Your Child's Rights in the IEP Process." Find out more.

CAMP SUMMIT WEST in Northern Calilfornia, for gifted (and 2e) kids, still has a few openings, according to its organizers. Find out more.

TEACHER CONTRIBUTIONS. When you think about what teachers bring to the classroom as they try to make sure their students do well, consider that they also buy classroom supplies, on average about $500 worth per year -- on a salary that usually doesn't reflect their value to society in the first place. Read more.

EDUCATION POLICY, PRACTICE, LAW, ADVOCACY. The items below are "big picture" items, things to think about when not immersed in IEPs, homework supervision, therapy sessions, medication monitoring, etc etc etc.
  • Congress in the U.S. is evidently considering rolling back access to higher education for students with disabilities and for underserved students, according to the National Center for Learning Disabilities. NCLD gives you a way to take action on the matter. 
  • COPAA, the Council of Parent Advocates and Attorneys, observes the anniversary of the Brown vs. Board of Education decision. They quote part of the decision, which provides a vision of education worth contemplating. COPAA relates "Brown" to IDEA, and writes, "COPAA fights to make that promise of an inclusive, high quality education for students with disabilities become and remain a reality." COPAA also refers to current efforts to undermine equal access to education; find the statement
  • Chalkbeat writes about the disproportionate amount of disciplinary actions faced by students with disabilities in Colorado. Go to Chalkbeat
  • Finally, two former U.S. Secretaries of Education write about partisanship and the state of the U.S. education system today. They, too, note the crucial role of education in America. They write, "Higher expectations and strong standards — backed by federal policy that protects the enormous taxpayer investment in K-12 schools and higher education — are bipartisan concerns. Respect for teaching, and the accompanying need for better preparation and support for teachers, must be one unifying goal." Find the piece.

No comments: